{{ (moduleVm.actions && moduleVm.changeStatus) ? moduleVm.status : '' }} Knowledge of Palliative Care and Advance Directives Among Speech-Language Pathology Students

Activity Steps

Description

Note: ASHA CEUs cannot be reported to ASHA unless your ASHA member number is included in your profile.

The authors discuss the findings of a study conducted to assess speech pathology students' awareness and knowledge about palliative care concepts and of the role of SLPs in palliative care. Findings showed that while SLP students were familiar with a concept or term, they were frequently unable to explain the concept accurately. These findings have implications for the design and content of education and training about palliative care in academic and clinical settings.

Accreditation

This course is offered for 0.10 ASHA CEUs
(Intermediate Level, Professional Area).

Purpose of Activity

To gain information about speech-language pathology students' knowledge of palliative care and Advance Directives.

Learning Objectives

After completing this continuing education activity you will be able to:

  1. Summarize information about the initiation of palliative care and hospice services.
  2. Identify the role of Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) on palliative care teams.
  3. Explain focus group findings of SLP students' knowledge of concepts and terms related to palliative care and Advance Directives.
Price: $15.00

Credits:

  • ASHA 0.1 CEU

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins is approved by the Continuing Education Board of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) to provide continuing education activities in speech-language pathology and audiology. ASHA CE Provider approval does not imply endorsement of course content, specific products or clinical procedures.

This course is offered for 0.10 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate Levels, Professional Area).

Test Code: TLD3202
Published: Jul/Sep 2020
Expires: 4/1/2023
Required Passing Score: 4/5 (80%)
Authors: Nidhi Mahendra, PhD, CCC-SLP; Marian Alonso
Specialties: Communication, Language, Speech